Michael Meets Kent PCC in Parliament

Michael recently met the Kent Police and Crime Commissioner, Matthew Scott, in Parliament.

The pair reviewed Mr Scott’s recent funding proposals for Kent Police and issues affecting Michael’s constituency casework.  The local MP was also happy to hear about the good progress of the new Police Constables in Sevenoaks, whom he had inspected during their Passing Out Parade last year.

Discussing key issuesMichael pressed Mr Scott to roll out a more effective speed prevention system in villages such as Otford and Brasted.  He welcomed the introduction of TruCam – a smart speedwatch system that administers on-the-spot fines to repeat offenders – but called for more immediate action.

Michael said: “Kent Police is getting the funding to increase the number of officers patrolling our streets.  But speeding remains a menace.  So it’s important that some of this money is put towards rolling out more effective tools for stopping speeders.”

Outstanding Achievement of Local Police

Michael has praised the achievements of local police following today’s news that Kent Police has once again been graded as ‘Outstanding’ for legitimacy.  The rating means that Kent Police is now the only police force in England and Wales to achieve the grade three years in a row.

The rating comes just weeks after Michael visited Kent Police Headquarters to inspect the new Police Constables in their Passing Out Parade.  Reacting to the announcement, the local MP said: “This is a significant achievement that reflects the police’s ability to maintain law and order in the constituency.”

According to the PEEL (police effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy) annual assessment of police forces by Her Majesty’s Inspectors, Kent Police is efficient and effective and is policing the county ‘by consent’.

Inspectors found that officers and staff have a clear understanding of the importance of treating everyone with respect and making fair decisions, as well as being friendly and approachable.  It recognises that Kent Police has a clearly defined vision and set of values and has invested in extensive training to ensure the workforce know what is expected of them.

The report concluded that the leadership of Kent Police demonstrates a very positive ethical approach to policing which is reflected throughout the force.

Spotting Invisible Wounds

‘Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.’

A saying that dates back to 1862, passed down through the generations; it embodies those British stereotypes of supressing emotions and stiffening the upper-lip.

Yet old adages contain old ideas, and such sayings standardise a stigma that we now need to move beyond: how we speak about mental health problems.

World Mental Health Day on Tuesday reminded us that 1 in 4 adults and 1 in 10 children are affected by mental illnesses.  The majority do not speak up and do not seek help.

By changing the way we discuss mental illnesses, we can start to provide people the support they need.

That’s why I am proud of this Government’s record investment in mental healthcare; mental and physical health now have parity in law.

Last week, the Prime Minister announced a review of the Mental Health Act to tackle longstanding injustices in our mental health system.  It’s about helping some of the most vulnerable in society.

It’s also about relieving our straining public services.  The NHS’s challenge with mental illnesses is marked by a 43 per cent increase in detainments within the past decade alone.  Around 40 per cent of police business in Kent is concerned with mental health problems.

To deal with this, we’ve increased the number of psychiatric consultants and we’ve taken steps to ensure that many thousands more young people will receive the right treatment at the right time by 2020.

Compared to 2010, 40 per cent more people access mental health services every day.  The number of mental health patients being held inappropriately in police cells is also down by 80 per cent over the same period.

We’re lucky that West Kent MIND, which has provided vital support for years, is based in Sevenoaks.  On Tuesday, they held training sessions for schools and businesses to facilitate workplace wellbeing. On Sunday, they’ll host a fun run in Knole Park to raise further awareness.

Tomorrow, I will visit Sevenoaks Hospital to open the new Wound Centre.  But I will remember those wounds that are often just as serious: the ones we cannot see.